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yoncevevo:

me @ drama i’m not involved in

image

scavjudges:

2004.247: A graduate thesis written on napkins from a dining hall, signed off on by a thesis committee. [20 points]

scavjudges:

2004.247: A graduate thesis written on napkins from a dining hall, signed off on by a thesis committee. [20 points]

homedesigning:

Whimsical Bathroom

homedesigning:

Whimsical Bathroom

fastcompany:

In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?
Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.
Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?
Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.
Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.
The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.
Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?
Read More>

In a study of stereotype threat and women’s performance on math tests, social psychologist Claude Steele and a team of researchers found that women who were told they were being tested for gender differences in math performance did significantly worse on math tests than women who weren’t told about a gender comparison before taking the test.

fastcompany:

In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?

Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.

Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?

Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.

Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.

The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.

Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?

Read More>

In a study of stereotype threat and women’s performance on math tests, social psychologist Claude Steele and a team of researchers found that women who were told they were being tested for gender differences in math performance did significantly worse on math tests than women who weren’t told about a gender comparison before taking the test.

(Source: gaypee)

richardharington:

pls watch this

bitty-batty:

You’re strolling along minding your own business…

when suddenly a car rolls up next to you

image

wtf is this

you look closer…

image

En garde fuckboy”

teophil:

sartorialjohnnyboy:

Aqua terra

visit http://teophil.tumblr.com/archive

teophil:

sartorialjohnnyboy:

Aqua terra

visit http://teophil.tumblr.com/archive

xplodingunicorn:

Posted 9/5/14 on JamesBreakwell.com, a webcomic updated Every. Single. Day.

xplodingunicorn:

Posted 9/5/14 on JamesBreakwell.com, a webcomic updated Every. Single. Day.

(Source: doingitadifferentway)

nothingtochance:

Split View Mountain Lodge /  Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter 

My colleague Roger Penrose once said that there are at least three worlds and three mysteries. One is the physical world. You know, this is the world where we exist. There are chairs, tables, there are stars, there are galaxies, and so on. Then there is a second world, which is the world of our consciousness, if you like. You know, a mental world, a world where — this is where we love, where we hate, you know, and so on. All our thoughts are there and so on. And then there is the third world, which is this world of mathematical forms. This is the world where all of mathematics is there. You know, the theorem of Pythagoras and so on and so forth, all this imaginary numbers and all that. So these are the three worlds. And now come these three mysteries. One mystery is that somehow, out of the physical world, our world of consciousness has emerged.

- The physicist Mario Livio in Who Ordered This? (via beingblog)

disaparte:

All I want is education, and I am afraid of no one
Malala Yousafzai

kazu721010:

Departamentos Charlotte / Michels Architekturbüro

kazu721010:

Departamentos Charlotte / Michels Architekturbüro